Combinations

When I was first learning karate, way back when I was a white belt, I was thrilled to do one big reverse punch. Huge punch with an even bigger draw hand. It was a big deal to master the skill. There were days I was sure that was all I’d ever be able to do.

I remember watching the more advanced students working on their combinations and thinking, “I’ll never be able to do that.” Feet going one direction, hands going another. Coordination is not my strength. I decided to be happy with what I could do, and leave it at that.

A funny thing happened, though. The longer I trained the simpler the combinations became. It’s a kick and then a punch. It’s two kicks and then a block. Taking the time to learn the basics is the key. Then, whatever combination an instructor wants to put them into you’ve already got a solid foundation. I try to explain that to my students now. There are times I see the same look in their eyes that I must have have in mine.

Have faith. One punch. One block. Do one thing at a time and do it well. That’s a lesson for both karate and for life. Now, I love roundhouse – same leg side thrust – step in punch. Not putting the foot down and following the two kicks (yeah, I can still kick high!) by a very solid punch makes me feel good. Heck, I’m even able to do five consecutive kicks of various kinds with the same leg – not putting my leg down. If anyone had ever told me I’d be doing that I’d have told them they were crazy. All I had to do was learn my kicks. Lots of repetitions until I could put them all together.

Never give up. Be persistent. Always believe you can. And take it one thing at a time.

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Persistence

I’ve never seen a student, in all of my years of training and teaching, who hasn’t succeeded when they have stuck with their training. Yeah, some of them have progressed slowly, but the important thing is, they have progressed. One of the things I love about the martial arts is that we’re not in a race or competing against anyone else. Its about doing your personal best.

Its an important lesson for everything in life, hang in there and keep trying. Don’t give up, even when it gets hard. I guess I’ve been thinking about that a lot lately. There were times in my own training when I questioned why I was doing it because I was struggling with one move or technique. Or a kata. Heian Sandan was almost my undoing. The first four moves. Trying to perfect them seemed impossible. Today, I look at them and think “a piece of cake”. Funny what time and practice can do.

Yesterday, my youngest son proved once again what persistence can do. He reached a personal milestone – ten straight years of training. That’s a long time in a kid’s life. And he struggled through some of it like everyone else. Today he wears his black belt with pride. He looks and acts like a Shodan.

And his students look at him with admiration. They want to be like him. He wears the title Sensei with honor and respect.

Persistence. That’s the magic potion that got both of us to where we are today. Don’t give up – especially when it gets hard. The rewards are immense for you and for those walking the path behind you. After all, you’re their inspiration. Remember, you can do anything you set your mind to.

A College Speech Class

Now what in the world could a college speech class and karate have in common? Hmmmm…..makes you wonder, doesn’t it? Yesterday my son – my high school aged son – delivered a speech in his communications class. When he was done his teacher told him how impressed she was with his composure and delivery. It was such a good speech that she wanted to have a copy of it to share with students in the years to come.

Still no idea how this relates to karate? Starting to wonder if this is just an excuse for a mom to brag about her fabulous kid? Well don’t. I’ll explain it.

Its like this. My son has trained in karate for almost ten straight years. He’s developed a confidence in himself and the ability to think quickly. He didn’t read the speech exactly as he’d written it. He ad libbed a line here and there. He could think on his feet and react to changes as necessary. His confidence drove him forward.

Plus, he spent a lot of time writing the speech. That’s that practice thing coming into play. He could have just written a first draft and said it was good enough. But he knew it wasn’t. It takes time to perfect a thing. Just like karate training. You do it. You redo it and you learn from what you did.

I think parents who put their children in the martial arts are giving them an incredible gift. It makes for a stronger child. A more confident student. It instills discipline and makes them leaders. How do I know this? All five of my children trained. I see the adults the other four have become. And I see the seeds blossoming in the fifth.

Give your child the gift that will help them the rest of their lives. Give them martial arts training. Its the nicest thing you can do for them.

A Day of Rest

Yesterday was a day of rest – a much needed day off from work. The dojo was closed offering an opportunity to have a nice quiet dinner with the family. That doesn’t seem to happen often enough with our hectic schedules.

Martial arts isn’t an occasional thing. Not if you want to get good. It demands persistence. It means putting on the gi and training regularly. The sense of commitment and fulfillment is huge, but I’m not going to lie – it’s a lot of hard work. I certainly understand when I hear that some of our younger students suffer from not wanting to put their uniforms on. Hey, we all think that once in a while, however, it comes back to attitude. If you want to be a black belt, train like a black belt. Don’t wait until you’re there.

And let’s face it – martial arts knows no season. It requires you keep it up even after summer changes to fall and through winter and on to spring until you meet up with summer again. A day of rest is a good thing. It brings me back to the dojo brimming over with determination and excitement.

Let those things fuel you today as well. Strive to be a little better than you were yesterday. Punch harder. Have better focus. Remember, doing karate isn’t about being the best ¬†– it’s about doing your personal best and growing a little each day.

What’s Your Attitude?

Yesterday I had conversations with two different children about the same thing. Attitude. Not that they were surly or difficult, because they weren’t. They just didn’t have the ‘no one is going to touch me’ kind of attitude. Both are really sweet kids and with great dispositions. Turning on the light switch for them – changing that attitude – is harder.

I’d like to think I’m the same way, but for me it’s second nature. I’m all fun and happiness until you want to hurt me and mine. Guys are like that, women not as often unless you mess with their children. Perhaps I find it easier to tap into the mama bear mindset than most. Going from zero to sixty takes practice and persistence, which is what I explained to the kids.

They seemed to understand but it will take continual focus – just like anything else you want to learn – before they get it. So, ask yourself, what’s your attitude? Could you defend yourself if you had to? If not, call a local martial arts school and have a chat with them. Find out what programs they offer and pick the one that’s the right fit for you. Make sure their attitude is about safety and not fees.

I want everyone to be safe. Make that call today.

 

Why Train?

We all come to karate from different places. Some as children because their parents understand it helps with focus and respect. Others want to try a new sport and some of us wander into it as adults. That’s how I ended up on the training mat. If I hadn’t finally relented and quit saying, “Karate’s not for girls,” I probably wouldn’t be writing this today. In hindsight, it was one of the best decisions I ever made.

Karate gave my little family something we never expected. When our world changed, the dojo became our extended family. We fostered friendships 24 years ago that we still have. We shared the training, the ups and downs and wonderful successes along the way. For us, it was about more than the focus and the dedication. It truly was a family affair. Part of that was wrapped in competitions. Yeah, I travelled across the country so my four kids could compete. I was that parent. And I’m proud to brag any time you want to listen about their multiple national championships. They earned them through hard work, sweat, sore muscles and dedicated focus.

It was the massive array of trophies and ‘war stories’ that led Christopher to want to train. There’s no doubt about that. Kid number five wasn’t around during the traveling competition years and he yearned for a piece of that history to call his own. I’m not going to lie, at first I tried to dissuade him. Coming to karate just for the trophies and the glory was the wrong reason. I knew all too well about the hard work, and hours upon hours of training necessary. Competitions needed to be secondary. The training itself, for defense and the pure love of karate needed to be first. How could I explain that to a four-year-old? A quick trip into the dojo to let him watch proved he wasn’t ready. It took three years before we, as parents, were sure that he was ready.

I’m glad we waited. A miraculous thing happened. He no longer talked about the trophies, instead immersing himself into the training. He proved himself and worked as hard as a seven-year-old can. That means he had his good days and his bad days. But when the good outnumbered the bad, I knew he was ready to reach for a dream. And he started competing. And winning. I’m proud of my State Champion. He earned the trophies but more importantly he kept focused on the true reason to train. He’s no longer that little orange belt with a trophy almost as big as him. He’s a black belt and a karate instructor. It’s about being strong, being focused and taking care of himself. Training for all the right reasons. More

Time

Like most human beings I want everything to happen instantaneously. No hard work, no waiting for the right time. I want it now. Karate isn’t like that. I’ve seen extremely gifted people begin training, excelling through the lessons faster than it seems possible. On the other hand, I’ve also seen those who have had to work hard, sweating and straining to achieve each milestone. ¬†Most of us are in the middle ground, paying our dues with sweat equity and determination.

Everything worth anything takes time. That’s why I sometimes have to chuckle when I see a brand spanking new black belt who struts around like they know everything. Little do they know – but they’ll learn soon enough – that they’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. They’re only now ready to learn. Lessons unfolding around them reveal something new, they hadn’t noticed before. So fixated on having a big draw hand they failed to see the role the hip plays in the punch.

Have patience. It takes time for the knowledge to seep in. Keep training with humility and dedication. The best things in life are truly worth waiting for. Persistence is the key that’s unlocked many a door. Respect your teachers. You’ll get there at your right time.

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