Karate Guys Don’t Cry

Yeah, you read that right. Karate guys don’t cry. They don’t let their emotions show. Restraint. That’s the word that I think most people think of when they consider what being a martial artist is about. Okay, maybe not restraint. They probably think of punching and kicking. Yelling and screaming.

So, I might as well make a confession. This karate ‘guy’ (yes, I use that term interchangeably) has cried more than they’d like to admit. And in the dojo even. Of course, in my defense, while the big fat tears were plopping on the mat I was handing my youngest child his Shodan Ho belt. They were tears of joy, with no way to stop them.

Since I’m making confessions I’ll share this as well. This karate girl even occasionally gives out hugs in the dojo. Last night one of my students was so overwhelmed she gave me several. I felt special. I knew that she cared about me and she also knew I cared for her. All the hours being bossy and yelling in class were absorbed with love. Making her a strong young lady has been my only goal for her. And its working.

Heck, since I’m in free confession mode here I might as well spill the rest of the beans. I even hold kiddos hands and help to coax my students through moments when they feel insecure. It happens more than you’d think. Last night a younger student was afraid to try a drill. She hung back, shaking her head, fear dominating her. Until I held her hand and said, “Let’s do it together.” What happened next warmed my heart. She did the drill and went on to have a blast in the class. We’d wrapped lessons in fun and she beamed the whole time.

Being a martial artist is so much more than changing students. Its about caring. Yes, this sensei does cry and hold hands. I’ve done it before and I’ll do it again. Whatever it takes to make my students believe in themselves – I’m there.

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Doing What Works

As a karate instructor I’m always looking for ways to improve my teaching skills along with ways to engage and motivate my students. Along with hours of research and studying, I watch other instructors to see what works. Adding another drill or another skill set to my students repertoire is important to me.

I found a way to help them recently – it came from a video about a retired school teacher. We may teach subjects that are miles apart but teaching is the same whether its math or kata. It takes repetition. It takes practice. It takes dedication. ¬†Watching that video made a difference in a couple of my students already. I’m glad I took the time and applied it to the dojo and my teaching.

After all, teaching is a matter of doing what works. It doesn’t matter where the idea comes from. It matters how you apply it to your own teaching style. I’m going to keep doing the drill. I like doing what works.